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Destination: Zimbabwe2018-10-05T01:53:34+00:00

Zimbabwe is a country located in Southern Africa bordered by South Africa, Botswana, Zambia and Mozambique. The country is populated by roughly 16 million people and extends a 390,759-sq. km. Although the country officially recognizes 16 different languages, the most prominently spoken is English. The country is rich and vibrant in culture and tradition as its population is comprised of the Shona and Ndebele ethnic groups, combined they make up 96% of the country’s population. The country is known for its various art forms, specifically the stone sculptures sold across the country in most markets and villages. Performative arts such as song and dance are an integral part of Zimbabwean culture and aid in the preservation of the country’s folklore and story-telling practices. Zimbabwe’s main currency in circulation is the US dollar, although many other currencies are accepted including the South African rand, Botswana pula, the Euro, Australian dollar, Pound Sterling, Chinese yuan Japanese yen and Indian rupee. Previously known as Rhodesia, the country has been in an extensive, on-going state of political unrest. In 1953 Rhodesia was one of three countries to collectively make up the Central African Federation, established by Britain. In 1965 the white minority government declared independence from Britain, but the country was not officially declared an independent nation until 1980 when Robert Mugabe came into power and the country took on the name of Zimbabwe. The country’s capital city and largest is Harare with a population of 1.5 million inhabitants. The agricultural industry is extremely important to Zimbabwe and strongly supports the country’s economy as sugar, cotton and tobacco are the country’s main exports. Zimbabwe’s geography is varied as Mountainous areas, river valleys and forests make up the diverse collection of landscapes. The country houses some of the most famous natural spectacles in the world, including the internationally noted Victoria Falls located in the Hwange District. Tourists travel from all over the globe to visit these spectacular falls as it has been named both a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the seven natural wonders of the world.

View Zimbabwe Itineraries

Zimbabwe National Parks and Game Reserves

VICTORIA FALLS NATIONAL PARK

Victoria Falls National Park is a National Park located in the Hwange District of Zimbabwe in Southern Africa. The park is named after arguably one of the most famous waterfalls in the world, Victoria Falls. Victoria Falls is considered to be the largest waterfall in the world due to the immensity of its combined height and width measurements and has been named both a natural UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the seven natural wonders of the world. The falls can be viewed from both of the countries which it exists between, both Zambia and Zimbabwe. Victoria Falls’ width is measured at 5,604 ft. and its height is measured at 304 ft. The river which supplies the water to the falls is the Zambezi River which experiences a seasonal flooding period between February and May. Victoria Falls collectively consists of five separate falls, one existing in Zambia and the other four in Zimbabwe. The falls in Zambia are known as the Eastern Cataract Falls and the four in Zimbabwe are the Main Falls, Rainbow Falls, Horseshoe Falls, and the Devil’s Cataract Falls. Victoria Falls National Park protects these falls along with the surrounding area including a rainforest and the south and east banks of the Zambezi River. The rain forest area within Victoria Falls National Park allows visitors to experience the unique vegetation on a trail known as the Zambezi Walkway, showcasing the vibrant bird and wildlife as well as incredible views of the falls themselves. The rainforest consists of many different plant and ?ower types including fruit-bearings trees, waterbroom trees, various tropical plants and African ebony trees. Hippopotami, elephant, baboon and buffalo are just a few of the many animal species that can be seen within the park. Along with walking trails a wide variety of activities are offered in and around Victoria Falls National Park including white water rafting, helicopter ?ights, horseback riding, and bungee jumping.

VICTORIA FALLS NATIONAL PARK

Victoria Falls National Park is a National Park located in the Hwange District of Zimbabwe in Southern Africa. The park is named after arguably one of the most famous waterfalls in the world, Victoria Falls. Victoria Falls is considered to be the largest waterfall in the world due to the immensity of its combined height and width measurements and has been named both a natural UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the seven natural wonders of the world. The falls can be viewed from both of the countries which it exists between, both Zambia and Zimbabwe. Victoria Falls’ width is measured at 5,604 ft. and its height is measured at 304 ft. The river which supplies the water to the falls is the Zambezi River which experiences a seasonal flooding period between February and May. Victoria Falls collectively consists of five separate falls, one existing in Zambia and the other four in Zimbabwe. The falls in Zambia are known as the Eastern Cataract Falls and the four in Zimbabwe are the Main Falls, Rainbow Falls, Horseshoe Falls, and the Devil’s Cataract Falls. Victoria Falls National Park protects these falls along with the surrounding area including a rainforest and the south and east banks of the Zambezi River. The rain forest area within Victoria Falls National Park allows visitors to experience the unique vegetation on a trail known as the Zambezi Walkway, showcasing the vibrant bird and wildlife as well as incredible views of the falls themselves. The rainforest consists of many different plant and ?ower types including fruit-bearings trees, waterbroom trees, various tropical plants and African ebony trees. Hippopotami, elephant, baboon and buffalo are just a few of the many animal species that can be seen within the park. Along with walking trails a wide variety of activities are offered in and around Victoria Falls National Park including white water rafting, helicopter ?ights, horseback riding, and bungee jumping.

HWANGE NATIONAL PARK

Hwange National Park is the largest nature reserve in all of Zimbabwe, spanning 14,650 sq. km. Having been established as a game reserve in 1928, and officially declared a national park in 1961, the park has experienced an extensive history. The parks name originates from a local Nhanzwa chief and was once the setting of the hunting grounds used by a Ndebele warrior king in the early 1800s. The Hwange National Parks vegetation is varied, consisting of acacia woodlands and various other tree types and shrubs. The park is also home to an abundance of animals, including each member of the big 5. Hwange National Park has previously suffered under the hands of poachers who left the elephant population of the park dwindling at less than 1,000 during the parks first years open. The population of elephants since the parks establishment has been on an incredible rise as numbers now reach over 20,000 and have actually threatened the parks existence due to over-population. The park has also made international headlines as it was the location of one of the largest game animal killings in 2013 when poachers killed over 300 elephants by poisoning their waterhole with cyanide.

MATOBO NATIONAL PARK

Matobo National Park is a park located in the Matobo District of Zimbabwe. The park was established in 1926 as a bequest by Cecil Rhodes, his burial site now resides there. The park land stretches for 424 sq. km, while the entire area of the hills is roughly 3,100 sq. km. In 2003 UNESCO declared Matobo National Park a World Heritage Site. Matobo National Park is Zimbabwes oldest national park and consists of unique rock formations, including granite stones that appear to be stacked and balancing on top of one another, formed over thousands of years due to volcanic activity. The parks rocky landscape inhabits few plants that have adapted to live in such conditions over time, including various aloe species and acacia trees. The Matobo Hills inhabit many different animal species including impalas, antelopes, leopards, zebra, hippos, giraffe, and white rhinoceros. Matobo Hills National Park is also known for its population of black eagles, the park houses the highest concentration of breeding pairs in the world. The park is historically significant in many ways and is the site of many burial grounds and cave dwellings with traditional rock art inside. These dwellings and well-preserved cave paintings provide insight to the previous peoples who had inhabited them thousands of years ago, dating back to the stone age. The folklore and tales of survival are depicted on these walls and are culturally significant as they show evidence of the hunter-gatherer ways of life. Other artefacts and remains have been recovered from Matobo Hills including various ancient tools and fire making areas during excavations.

MATOBO NATIONAL PARK

Matobo National Park is a park located in the Matobo District of Zimbabwe. The park was established in 1926 as a bequest by Cecil Rhodes, his burial site now resides there. The park land stretches for 424 sq. km, while the entire area of the hills is roughly 3,100 sq. km. In 2003 UNESCO declared Matobo National Park a World Heritage Site. Matobo National Park is Zimbabwes oldest national park and consists of unique rock formations, including granite stones that appear to be stacked and balancing on top of one another, formed over thousands of years due to volcanic activity. The parks rocky landscape inhabits few plants that have adapted to live in such conditions over time, including various aloe species and acacia trees. The Matobo Hills inhabit many different animal species including impalas, antelopes, leopards, zebra, hippos, giraffe, and white rhinoceros. Matobo Hills National Park is also known for its population of black eagles, the park houses the highest concentration of breeding pairs in the world. The park is historically significant in many ways and is the site of many burial grounds and cave dwellings with traditional rock art inside. These dwellings and well-preserved cave paintings provide insight to the previous peoples who had inhabited them thousands of years ago, dating back to the stone age. The folklore and tales of survival are depicted on these walls and are culturally significant as they show evidence of the hunter-gatherer ways of life. Other artefacts and remains have been recovered from Matobo Hills including various ancient tools and fire making areas during excavations.

MANA POOLS NATIONAL PARK

Mana Pools National Park is a national park in northern Zimbabwe. The park stretches 2,196 sq. km and is home to a variety of plant and animal species. The parks name originates from the four pools that make up a portion of the area. In 1984 Mana Pools National Park was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in combination with two other areas, the Chewore safari area and the Sapi safari area. Mana Pools National Park consists of a varied landscape as it is covered in dense baobabs, woodland and the Zambezi River. The park is home to a range of animals including zebra, leopard, cheetah, hyenas, wild dog, and the largest concentration of both hippopotami and crocodiles. At one point, Mana Pools National Park had a staggeringly large population of black rhino but due to the severe effect of poaching, that number had dwindled by the 1990s down to a mere 10 rhinos and they have now been relocated. The park is an excellent place for bird watching as just under 400 unique species exist within the park. Visitors can enjoy a scenic safari walk, or can canoe down the Zambezi River enjoying the wildlife from two unique perspectives.

CHIVERO RECREATIONAL PARK

Chivero Recreational Park is a park that consists of the land surrounding Lake Chivero in the Zvimba District of Zimbabwe. The park was first established as a national park in 1952, and was eventually named a recreational park in 1975. Although the park is only 61 sq.km, it occupies many species of plants and animals. Animals that can be found within the park include white rhino, kudu, waterbuck, impala, eland and many more species of smaller animals including baboon, monkeys, hedgehogs, aardvark, and porcupine. The park is also a bird-watchers delight as over 400 unique species can be spotted within the park. Lake Chivero Recreational Park is also the site of historical significance as bushmen rock paintings have been discovered in multiple areas of the park. There are multiple activities for visitors to take part in while visiting Lake Chivero Recreational Park including game walks, fishing, hiking, biking and canoeing.

CHIVERO RECREATIONAL PARK

Chivero Recreational Park is a park that consists of the land surrounding Lake Chivero in the Zvimba District of Zimbabwe. The park was first established as a national park in 1952, and was eventually named a recreational park in 1975. Although the park is only 61 sq.km, it occupies many species of plants and animals. Animals that can be found within the park include white rhino, kudu, waterbuck, impala, eland and many more species of smaller animals including baboon, monkeys, hedgehogs, aardvark, and porcupine. The park is also a bird-watchers delight as over 400 unique species can be spotted within the park. Lake Chivero Recreational Park is also the site of historical significance as bushmen rock paintings have been discovered in multiple areas of the park. There are multiple activities for visitors to take part in while visiting Lake Chivero Recreational Park including game walks, fishing, hiking, biking and canoeing.

GONAREZHOU NATIONAL PARK

Gonarezhou National Park is a national park located in the Chiredzi District of Zimbabwe. The park was formed in 1975 and is second largest in size after Hwange National Park, the land stretches 5,054 sq. km. As the park is located in a remote area and the its landscape consists of very rough ground, it is a lesser-visited national park and maintains its un-touched beauty, offering a truly wild African landscape. The vegetation of the Gonarezhou landscape consists of dense bushland and scattered baobab trees. Gonarezhou National Park is recognized by its famed Chilojo Cliffs, large, red sandstone formations towering over the landscape below. Three rivers run through the land of the park, creating streams and pools that animals can be found congregating at. The park inhabits many animals including elephant, zebra, cheetah, leopard, hippopotami, and more. The park is known for both its wild dog and elephant populations, with more than 10,000 elephants living within the park.

CHIZARIRA NATIONAL PARK

Chizarira National Park is located in Northern Zimbabwe and is measured 2,000 sq. km. In 1938 the parks land was designated as a non-hunting reserve, it later became a game reserve in 1963 and was then established as a national park in 1975. The park consists of an extremely rugged and wild terrain, with most of the vegetation within the park being made up of wild bush. Chizarira is one of the wildest national parks, if not the wildest in all of Zimbabwe and is visited very infrequently by travelers. Although the wildlife population has decreased over the years, many large mammals can still be found within the park including cheetah, wild dog, elephants, lion, buffalo, hyena, hippo and crocodile. The park is ideal for scenic walks as the park is an un-touched spectacle of true remoteness, 4×4 game drives are also appropriate as the terrain of the parks landscape is harsh and rugged.

CHIZARIRA NATIONAL PARK

Chizarira National Park is located in Northern Zimbabwe and is measured 2,000 sq. km. In 1938 the parks land was designated as a non-hunting reserve, it later became a game reserve in 1963 and was then established as a national park in 1975. The park consists of an extremely rugged and wild terrain, with most of the vegetation within the park being made up of wild bush. Chizarira is one of the wildest national parks, if not the wildest in all of Zimbabwe and is visited very infrequently by travelers. Although the wildlife population has decreased over the years, many large mammals can still be found within the park including cheetah, wild dog, elephants, lion, buffalo, hyena, hippo and crocodile. The park is ideal for scenic walks as the park is an un-touched spectacle of true remoteness, 4×4 game drives are also appropriate as the terrain of the parks landscape is harsh and rugged.

MATUSADONA NATIONAL PARK

Matusadona National Park is a national park is located in northern Zimbabwe. The park was named after the Matsudona Hills that make up a portion of the national park. The land was considered a protected area in 1958 and was declared a game reserve in 1963. Finally, in 1975 the park was officially established as a national park. Matusadona National Park measures a 1,400-sq. km in size and consists of both mountainous, rugged landscape and stretching plains. The park is known for its remote location and true, untouched wilderness. Animals that live within the park include buffalo, hippo, lion, elephant, waterbuck, zebra and impala. The park is known for its large populations of both elephant herds and lions. Due to these large populations of elephants, the land has been worn and some trees have been damaged. Activities that visitors can take part in when visiting Matusadona National Park include fishing, 4×4 drives, as well as boat and canoe excursions.

NYANGA NATIONAL PARK

Nyanga National Park is one of Zimbabwes oldest national parks and was first established in 1926, it stretches a 472-sq. km. The park underwent an expansion in 1990 and had almost doubled the size that it had been before. The parks area is home to many streams and rivers running through the land. Nyanga National Parks landscape and vegetation consists of both woodlands and rainforest area. The high altitudes of the area heavily affect the vegetation and wildlife, as there is a large pine forest growing within the park. Some animals that can be seen within the park include kudu, eland, zebra, wildebeest and waterbuck. As the park is very old, ruins have been discovered throughout the area and display evidence of the ancient lives of those who occupied the area thousands of years ago.

NYANGA NATIONAL PARK

Nyanga National Park is one of Zimbabwes oldest national parks and was first established in 1926, it stretches a 472-sq. km. The park underwent an expansion in 1990 and had almost doubled the size that it had been before. The parks area is home to many streams and rivers running through the land. Nyanga National Parks landscape and vegetation consists of both woodlands and rainforest area. The high altitudes of the area heavily affect the vegetation and wildlife, as there is a large pine forest growing within the park. Some animals that can be seen within the park include kudu, eland, zebra, wildebeest and waterbuck. As the park is very old, ruins have been discovered throughout the area and display evidence of the ancient lives of those who occupied the area thousands of years ago.

KAZUMA PAN NATIONAL PARK

Kazuma Pan National Park is a national park located close to the Zimbabwe-Botswana border. The park stretches 313 sq. km and was established in 1949. Initially, Kazuma Pan was formed with the intention of protecting animals during the hunting seasons. The parks title of national park was taken away in 1964, as there was a lack of development taking place but was given back the title in 1975. Kazuma Pan National Parks landscape consists of pan depressions and rolling plains, baboon trees within the park are also a recognizable staple. Kazuma Pan National Park is relatively untouched and considered a wildlife gem amongst other national parks. There are many animals living within the park including lions, giraffe, antelope, leopard and zebra. The park is also a popular destination for many water birds and various species can be spotted after the rainy season in the pans.